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Publication and Press Releases
2013
March
Heritage Museum recommends special exhibition for Easter holidays
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     Easter is just around the corner. Those making family plans for the holidays should consider a fabulous exhibition organised by the Hong Kong Heritage Museum. The four celebrated Fabergé Easter Eggs on show are special treasures that should not be missed! These unique and extraordinary eggs, originally created for the Russian imperial family, represent the height of Russian jewellery craftsmanship and continue to amaze audiences today. Provided by the Moscow Kremlin Museums and the Fersman Mineralogical Museum of Russia, these four imperial eggs, along with some 200 pieces of jewellery and adornments once belonging to the Russian imperial family, are now on display the exhibition, “Fabergé: Legacy of Imperial Russia”.

     The Assistant Curator (Fine Art) of the Hong Kong Heritage Museum, Mr Sunny Tang, explained that in the late 19th century the master goldsmith and jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé (1846–1920) was commissioned with the task of creating ornate, jewelled Easter eggs for the Russian court. Incorprating splendid workmanship and innovative design, Fabergé's Easter eggs astonished the Russian royal family and are now recognised as artistic masterpieces around the world.

     Mr Tang said, “After the Russian Revolution, 42 imperial eggs have survived until today. Ten of them were collected by the Moscow Kremlin Museum, which chose four Easter eggs for display in Hong Kong. They are the Memory of Azov, the Trans-Siberian Train, the Moscow Kremlin and the Constellation Tsarevich. Each egg is not only uniquely designed, but also tells a story about Russian history.”

     The Memory of Azov Easter Egg was made to commemorate the journey undertaken by the Tsar Alexander III's sons to the Far East in 1890 to 1891. The “surprise” inside the egg is a miniature replica of the Imperial Russian Navy cruiser “Memory of Azov”. It is skilfully executed down to the smallest details that replicate the rigging of the cruiser - tiny platinum boats, anchors on chains, cobweb-thin ropes of the finest gold on masts and in microscopic letters the name “Azov” can all be seen with the naked eye.

     The Trans-Siberian Train Easter Egg was made in 1900 to commemorate the building of the Trans-Siberian Railway. The railway was referred to as the “spine of Russia”, and in Alexander III's vision was to connect the European and Asian parts of the country. A route map of the railway is engraved across the face of the egg. The “surprise” in this egg is a miniature Trans-Siberian train which can be set in motion by winding the mechanism with a tiny key.

     The Moscow Kremlin Easter Egg was created in memory of the visit of Tsar Nicholas II and Tsarina Alexandra Fyodorovna to the historic capital Moscow at Easter, 1903. The egg, with its white enamel surface and a gold dome, was inspired by the Cathedral of the Assumption where the tsars were crowned. The structure that supports the egg has four Kremlin turrets. This design reflects a combination of imperial authority and religion. The “surprise” inside the gold turret-and-wall structure is a music box that plays two traditional Easter hymns.

     The Constellation Tsarevich Easter Egg is an unfinished art piece. The upper half of the egg displays constellations of the northern hemisphere using precious stones, and the largest stone was due to be in the constellation Leo, under which Alexei the Tsarevich or the crown prince, the main hope of the Tsar's family for continuation of the dynasty, was born. Unfortunately however, the outbreak of the Russian Revolution marked the end of the Romanov dynasty and this egg was never finished.

     To enhance visitors' knowledge of the exhibition and Russian culture, the Hong Kong Heritage Museum has organised a series of talks, workshops and public guide tours. On April 6, Mr Tang will introduce the stories behind the Fabergé eggs in a talk titled "A Glimpse of Treasure – Stories behind the Fabergé Eggs". Independent traveller Ms Lannie Mok will reflect on the Russian customs she discovered during her travels in a talk titled "Walking on the Land – A Journey through Russian Culture and Art" on April 20. The lectures, to be conducted in Cantonese, will be held from 2.30pm to 4pm at the museum's Seminar Room. Admission is free.

     In addition, a fun-filled workshop "Bling Bling Easter Eggs" will be arranged for young visitors aged 6 to 10 at the museum's Education Studio at 3pm on March 24 and April 28. Participants will each be able to design a colourful and sparkling Easter egg and a necklace, with all materials provided. Each workshop session can accommodate a maximum of 15 children and the fee for each participant is $38.

     All fringe activities are now open for enrolment. For details, please visit the Hong Kong Heritage Museum's website at www.hk.heritage.museum  or call 2180 8260.

     Guided tours of the exhibition are also available. Conducted in Cantonese, the tours will take place in the exhibition gallery at 2pm on Thursdays, and 11.30am and 3.30pm on Saturdays and Sundays. Advance booking is not required.

     Currently on display at the Hong Kong Heritage Museum, the “Fabergé: Legacy of Imperial Russia” exhibition will run until April 29. Standard admission tickets for the exhibition are priced at $20 (Thursday to Monday) and $10 (Wednesdays only). Full-time students, senior citizens and people with disabilities can enjoy concession fees, which are $10 (Thursday to Monday) and $5 (Wednesdays only).

     The Hong Kong Heritage Museum is located at 1 Man Lam Road, Sha Tin. It is open from 10am to 6pm on weekdays, and from 10am to 7pm on Saturday, Sundays and public holidays. The museum is closed on Tuesdays (except public holidays). For enquiries, please call 2180 8188.

Ends/Friday, March 22, 2013
Issued at HKT 18:31

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This Moscow Kremlin Easter Egg was created in memory of the visit of Tsar Nicholas II and Tsarina to the historic capital Moscow at Easter, 1903. Inside the structure of the egg there is a music box that plays two traditional Easter hymns.

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Pictured is the Constellation Tsarevich Easter Egg, which was unfinished due to the outbreak of the Russian Revolution.

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Currently on display at the Hong Kong Heritage Museum, the Fabergé Easter eggs, created with splendid workmanship, are the highlights of the exhibition.

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Currently on display at the Hong Kong Heritage Museum, the Fabergé Easter eggs, created with splendid workmanship, are the highlights of the exhibition.

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To tie-in with the "Fabergé: Legacy of Imperial Russia" exhibition, the Hong Kong Heritage Museum has organised a series of educational programmes including the "Bling Bling Easter Eggs" workshops organised for young visitors, enabling them to create sparkling Easter eggs on their own.

 

 

 

 

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