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Publication and Press Releases
2009
June
Science Museum unwraps a "sweet" exhibition
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     A "tasty" exhibition to reveal the biology, chemistry, physiology and psychology of the world of candy was unwrapped at the Hong Kong Science Museum today (June 26) and will run until October 28.

     "Candy Unwrapped", featuring 17 groups of interactive exhibits, will satisfy the mind of visitors even as it tickles their taste buds through looking at, smelling and tasting the exhibits.

     Speaking at the opening ceremony of the exhibition today, the Assistant Director (Heritage and Museums) of Leisure and Cultural Services, Dr Louis Ng, said the Hong Kong Science Museum organised this exhibition to give children an educational and entertaining experience for the summer holidays.

     "Candy is not only for kids. Chocolate is also a favourite of ladies. With stories about romantic memories and magical powers of chocolate, visitors will learn about the rich history and culture of candy and other yummy treats from around the world. We believe the exhibition will enable all family members, young and old, to discover the fun and the science and psychology behind the candy," Dr Ng said.

     Produced by the Ontario Science Centre in collaboration with Ybrick Design 3D Inc, "Candy Unwrapped" invites visitors to bring their taste buds for some sensational sugary science. Visitors can examine the structure and many uses of sugar, which is more than just a sweet treat and has qualities that are useful in many things. They can see how sugar has been used to preserve food, bind concrete and even heal wounds. They are also invited to walk across the face of an enlarged sugar crystal to learn about the various phases of crystallisation, the beauty of nature’s final design, and what sugar crystals have in common with stacks of oranges in a supermarket.

     Visitors can explore how taste and other senses, such as sight and smell, are used by the human body to determine what tastes good. Using their taste buds, they can learn the biological point of puckering by experiencing the super sour challenge, and discover the difference between taste and flavour through participating in a jelly bean test.

     The rich history and cultural diversity of candy and other treats from around the world are featured in the exhibition. Visitors can discover the fascinating stories behind treats from a dozen countries, from Chinese ginger candies to Nigerian puff-puffs. Some unusual past and present candies are also on display, and visitors will learn through the exhibits why some of them are still popular in modern times.

     The exhibition will detail the history of chocolate, including different forms of chocolate that have emerged over thousands of years and how chocolate bars are made. Visitors can also experience how candies bring back romantic memories, and find out whether chocolate is always associated with romance, or is it simply a psychological effect?  Visitors can discover more by entering into a boudoir to learn about the cultural legacy and intriguing chemical properties of chocolate.

     Visitors can jump on the energy burn bike and pedal for one minute to find out the calories of a sugar cube and how many calories they can burn off in 60 seconds. They will learn about the way their body creates and uses energy and which types of food energy work best for them. Kids can design and draw their own candy wrapper or jump on the cushy giant tongue and learn about the sensory complexity of the human tongue.

     Admission to "Candy Unwrapped" is $35 with half-price concession for full-time students, people with disabilities and senior citizens aged 60 or above. "Free Admission on Wednesdays" and the Museum Weekly Pass will not apply to this exhibition.

     The Science Museum is located at 2 Science Museum Road, Tsim Sha Tsui East, Kowloon. It is open from 1pm to 9pm from Monday to Friday, and from 10am to 9pm on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays. It is closed on Thursdays (except public holidays).

     For details of the exhibition and related programmes, visit the Science Museum's website (hk.science.museum). For enquiries, please call 2732 3232.

Ends/Friday, June 26, 2009
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062601

Climbing up an enlarged sugar crystal, the "Crystal Mountain", visitors can learn about the various phases of crystallisation and the beauty of nature's final design.

062602

The exhibit, "Delectable Delights", allows visitors to learn about treats from around the world and how some of these treats taste surprisingly like some of our familiar foods.

062603

 Jumping on the "Taste Bud Tango", a cushy giant tongue, visitors can learn about the sensory complexity of the human tongue.

062604

"A Bar is Born" details the history of chocolate, including different forms of chocolate that have emerged over thousands of years and how chocolate bars are made.

062605

Chocolate has long been considered an aphrodisiac. Is this a scientific fact or sexy myth? Visitors can discover more by entering into "Romancing the Bean" to learn about the cultural legacy and intriguing chemical properties of chocolate.

 

 

 

   
 
 

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