ICH Talk Series: Migrants and Hong Kong Intangible Cultural Heritage

 

Jointly Organised by: 

Intangible Cultural Heritage Office and the Centre for Hong Kong History and Culture Studies, Chu Hai College of Higher Education, Hong Kong

In association with:

Hong Kong Museum of History

Venue:

Lecture Hall, G/F, Hong Kong Museum of History (100 Chatham Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong)

Language:

Cantonese

 

 
ICH Talk Series: Migrants and Hong Kong Intangible Cultural Heritage ICH Talk Series: Migrants and Hong Kong Intangible Cultural Heritage ICH Talk Series: Migrants and Hong Kong Intangible Cultural Heritage

 

Migrants and Hong Kong Intangible Cultural Heritage

Hong Kong is located on the eastern bank of the Pearl River estuary and became home to early inhabitants such as the She and Yao people centuries ago. Due to a number of historical factors, including Westerners coming to China as well as social unrest in the Mainland, there have been waves of mass migration to Hong Kong over time. Generations of immigrants settled here, and also through inhabitation, multicultural contact, integration and assimilation, they have become local people. These incomers brought with them their customs, habits and cultures from their places of origin. This lecture focuses on the migration of people and their impact on Hong Kong culture, and in particular on intangible cultural heritage.

 

Date

4 July (Saturday)

Time

2-4 pm

Speaker

Professor SIU Kwok Kin
(Director of the Centre for Hong Kong History and Culture Studies, Chu Hai College of Higher Education)

 

Folk Beliefs of Hakka People in Hong Kong: Cases Studies on Tam Kung (Lord Tam) and Sam Shan Kwok Wong (Kings of Three Mountains)

Both Tam Kung (Lord Tam) and Sam Shan Kwok Wong (Kings of the Three Mountains) are widely believed by the Hakka people. However, there are many questions about these gods, such as their divinity, positions and duties, etc. There are also different legends, sacrifice offerings and attributes related to the same god. As such, it is worth finding out the reasons behind such differences. This lecture takes Tam Kung and Sam Shan Kwok Wong as examples to tell different stories about the gods based on their integration into the Hakka people's unique beliefs and customs.

 

Date

11 July (Saturday)

Time

2-4 pm

Speaker

Dr NGAI Ting Ming
(Associate Researcher of the Centre for Hong Kong History and Culture Studies, Chu Hai College of Higher Education)

 

Current Situation and Transmission of the Jiao Festivals Celebrated by the Fisherfolk in Hong Kong

The fishing industry once made an important contribution to Hong Kong's economy and a large number of fishermen settled within Hong Kong's waters. These fisherfolk formed a unique group within the community and brought with them some traditional beliefs and customs. They even performed traditional ceremonies on their vessels, including the Jiao ritual carried out in the water. Local fishermen mainly worshipped the deities Tin Hau and Chu Tai Sin. They would form a ceremonial field by gathering their vessels together in the sea. They would then perform a salvation ritual, and pray for good weather and good fish catches. This lecture introduces the characteristics, current situation and inheritance of the Jiao ritual of the local fisherfolk.

 

Date

17 October (Saturday)

Time

2-4 pm

Speaker

Dr CHAN Tak Ho
(Senior Editor of the Hong Kong Chronicles Institute)

 

 

Singing by the Sea: Transmission and Innovation of Hong Kong Fisherfolk's Ballads on Land

The sea has been home to many fishermen who earned their living by fishing. Their singing traditions and songs are named according to their ethnicity, dialects and ways of presentation, and are commonly known as "tanka songs", "saltwater songs", "laments" and "fisherfolk ballads", etc. With the decline of the local fishing industry, some fishermen moved onto the land to make a living. As a result, many of their traditional customs changed and their singing traditions gradually diminished within the urban environment.

 

Date

24 October (Saturday)

Time

2-4 pm

Speaker

Dr WONG King Chung
(Assistant Executive Director of The Conservancy Association Centre for Heritage)

 

Demonstrators:Ms. LAI Tai Kam, Ms. Kiki NG

 

Folk Religion of Hong Kong Chiu Chow Community: Case Studies on the Tin Kung Festival and Tin Hau Festival

The period from the 1950s to 1960s witnessed an influx of Chiu Chow natives to Hong Kong, although a local Chiu Chow community had already been established here well before World War II. Festivals and temples became focal points and gathering places for the Chiu Chow people in Hong Kong. This lecture takes the Tin Hau Temple, Lok Fu, the Gods of Heaven and Earth Temple at Sham Tseng and the festive celebrations of the Chiu Chow community in Kowloon City as examples, which, through the Tin Kung (Jade Emperor) Festival on the 9th day of the first lunar month and the Tin Hau Festival on the 23rd day of the third lunar month, not only bring people together from their hometowns, but also play a role in maintaining the neighbourhood community, respecting the elderly and helping the poor. These events also help to spread Chiu Chow culture, which includes valuable customs to be passed on to future generations.

 

Date

31 October (Saturday)

Time

2-4 pm

Speaker

Professor YAU Chi On
(Deputy Director of the Centre for Hong Kong History and Culture Studies, Chu Hai College of Higher Education)

 

 

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