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Publication and Press Releases
2013
July
3D dome show explores solar system's wildest weather conditions
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     The Hong Kong Space Museum has just launched the latest 3D dome show, "Wildest Weather in the Solar System 3D", which will take audiences on a spacecraft journey to explore the extreme weather conditions of the solar system.

     Audiences looking to gain an in-depth understanding of neighbouring worlds will join Erion, a newly designed spacecraft, which has all sorts of equipment specially designed for certain celestial bodies. The array of equipment includes an orbiter, a lander and multi-stage probes, which can all stand up to all kinds of extreme weather.

     The audience will first take a close look at a violent solar storm and how it leads to the loss of atoms at its nearest planet, Mercury, due to the planet's lack of an atmosphere to regulate the surface temperature - a situation that can create extraordinary temperature differences between day and night. Erion will then pass through thick clouds of sulphuric acid and land on the hot surface of Venus, where the average temperature reaches 460 degrees Celsius, high enough to melt lead. Also, viewers will see how the heat of the Sun causes turbulence in the Martian atmosphere: a vortex propels dust to form a dust devil with a height of 20 kilometres, more than double the height of Mount Everest, Earth's highest peak. After this, the audience can appreciate the super lightning that occurs in Jupiter's Great Red Spot as well as tour rivers and oceans formed by liquid methane on Titan, Saturn's largest moon. In addition, Erion will take audiences to Neptune to experience the strongest super hurricane and the fiercest diamond rain in the solar system. The journey will finally end with a visit to Triton, the largest moon of Neptune, to admire the extraordinary cryovolcanoes.

     After following the 25-minute journey of the "Wildest Weather in the Solar System 3D" and learning more about the solar system's most extreme weather, audience members will be glad to live on Earth.

     The show will be screened daily at 2.40pm and 6.10pm until December 30 at the museum's Stanley Ho Space Theatre. There will be an additional screening at 11.10am on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays. The museum is closed on Tuesdays (except public holidays).

     Tickets are available at the Hong Kong Space Museum Box Office and at all URBTIX outlets for $24 (front stalls) and $32 (stalls). Full-time students, senior citizens aged 60 or above and people with disabilities are eligible for a half-price concession.

     The Hong Kong Space Museum is located at 10 Salisbury Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon. For further information, call 2721 0226 or visit the website at www.3d.hk.space.museum .

Ends/Wednesday, July 10, 2013
Issued at HKT 20:10

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Solar flares eject large clouds of charged particles into space at a speed of 700 kilometres per second. These particles will reach Earth within a few days and cause a solar storm.

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The atmosphere of Venus is mainly composed of carbon dioxide, which is a type of greenhouse gas. The runaway greenhouse effect on Venus resulted in the evaporation of all water, causing its surface temperature to reach 460 degrees Celsius, high enough to melt lead.

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The ice particles within Jupiter's Great Red Spot rub against each other, creating electric charges which form super bolts of lightning. In terms of the electricity released, they are 10 times more powerful than those on Earth.

 

 

 

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