Annual Report 2003 - Leisure and Cultural Services Department Brand Hong Kong - Asia's world city
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  Antiquities and Monuments Office

Through the Antiquities and Monuments Office (AMO), the department plays an important role in the preservation and promotion of Hong Kong's heritage. A highlight of the year was the designation of Hau Ku Shek ancestral hall as declared monument, bringing the total number of declared monuments in Hong Kong to 78. The office also carried out restoration and repair work on 40 historical buildings, including the Man Mo Temple in Tai Po, Wong Uk in Shatin, Man Lun Fung ancestral hall in San Tin, and the Hau Mei Fung and Liu Man Shek ancestral halls in Sheung Shui.

Staff of the Antiquities and Monuments Office oversee the restoration and repair work of the Hau Mei Fung ancestral hall in Sheung Shui.
Staff of the Antiquities and Monuments Office oversee the restoration and repair work of the Hau Mei Fung ancestral hall in Sheung Shui.

The AMO continues to conduct rescue excavations at archaeological sites threatened by development and to monitor other sites. Some 180 such operations were undertaken in 2003. The office also contributed to the Environmental Impact Assessment studies for development projects, and monitored field investigations and the implementation of mitigation measures of Heritage Impact Assessment.

Jointly organised by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), the AMO co-organised with the Lord Wilson Heritage Trust and the University Museum and Art Gallery of the University of Hong Kong, 'the UNESCO Asia-Pacific Regional Workshop on the 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage'. The workshop was held at the Hong Kong Museum of History from November 18-20. Around 100 experts in underwater archaeology and Law of the Sea from more than 20 countries and cities attended the 3-day workshop. Feedback from the participants and the community was positive.

The Lui family generously donated the historic Lui Seng Chun building to the government in October 2003 for preservation and adaptive re-use. As a pilot scheme, the office will arrange basic repairs which will pave the way for revitalising the building into a tourism attraction and cultural landmark in the district. Private sector involvement will be sought for the future operation and management of Lui Seng Chun.

Lui Seng Chun, one of the few remaining historical 'tong lau', or Chinese tenement, in the city.
Lui Seng Chun, one of the few remaining historical 'tong lau', or Chinese tenement, in the city.
 
 
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