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Science Theatre

HK SciFest 2016 Science Theatre Series

Film Title Date Time
How To Colonise The Stars 02-03-2016 (Wednesday)
03-04-2016 (Sunday)
2:30pm - 3:30pm
How Nature Works: Grassland 23-03-2016 (Wednesday)
10-04-2016 (Sunday)
2:30pm - 3:30pm
How Nature Works: Seasonal Forest 30-03-2016 (Wednesday)
17-04-2016 (Sunday)
2:30pm - 3:30pm
How Nature Works: Waterworlds 06-04-2016 (Wednesday)
24-04-2016 (Sunday)
2:30pm - 3:30pm
I Remember When I Paint 13-04-2016 (Wednesday)
20-04-2016 (Wednesday)
2:30pm - 3:30pm

How to Colonise the Stars
This film uses a mixture of interviews, NASA footage and computer animations to look at the technologies, which allow us to see more clearly the unimaginably distant worlds. The settlement of space is a huge challenge. The undertaking is vast. But the technology to detect planets around other stars is here already. Scientists can even start to speculate about ways to travel to other stars and set up colonies there.

How Nature Works: Grassland
This episode brings you to the savannahs of Kenya; the grasslands of Australia; and the Cerrado of Brazil to witness how one of our most important ecosystems works – grasslands. In Kenya we witness the surprisingly important role that rhinos play in making the grasslands fit for antelopes. In the Brazilian Cerrado, we reveal how maned wolves get by on a low nitrogen diet, with the help of an odd dietary supplement – a fruit. In Australia, we encounter a weird cast of mini grassland characters, like bandicoots, rock wallabies and quolls. Finally, we return to East Africa to reveal how one extraordinary part of the ecosystem works – one built around the acacia tree.

How Nature Works: Seasonal Forest
Seasonal forests are special. Their ecosystems have to cope with drastic change twice a year, in spring and autumn. Not only do the individual inhabitants have to deal with that change, but the entire ecosystem has to transform itself at exactly the same time. Over the course of a year in the vast seasonal forests of North America, you can see flying squirrels leaping from tree to tree in the fall, how a lynx survives the winter, the crucial effect that caterpillars have on the forest canopy, and the importance to the forest of a bear's fishing exploits.

How Nature Works: Waterworlds
In this episode, we follow water on a journey that takes us across the world – from the remote mountain streams, via luscious wetlands and swamps, to coral reefs and the deep ocean. We begin high in the mountains of Iceland, in the North Atlantic; then reach the world's greatest wetland – the Pantanal in South Amercia. We then travel to the Sunderbans – a vast mangrove swamp at the mouth of the Ganges in Bangladesh. We then travel to the coral reefs of the Maldives, where we investigate the puzzle of where reefs get their food. Finally, we sail far out into the deep ocean to reveal how ocean currents work.

I Remember Better When I Paint
Alzheimer's disease affects patients' thinking, memory and language abilities. Although some medicines show delayed effect in early- and mid-stage of the disease, there is no cure. A research offers pivotal new insights into the treatment of Alzheimer's disease through the creative arts. The film shows how creative workshops are being embraced as exciting and effective therapy, opening doors of communication between those living with the disease and their caregivers and families.

 

Curriculum Links: S4-S6 Integrated Science and Combined Science

Venue: Lecture Hall, Hong Kong Science Museum
Language: English narration with Chinese subtitles
Enquiries: 2732 3223 (Mon to Fri: 9:00 am to 1:00 pm, 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm, except public holidays)
Free admission on a first come, first served basis

 

"Collider: Step inside the World's Greatest Experiment" Supplementary Activities

Film Title Date Time
What Happened Before the Big Bang? 04-05-2016 (Wednesday)
08-05-2016 (Sunday)
11-05-2016 (Wednesday)
2:00pm - 3:00pm
The Hunt for the Higgs 04-05-2016 (Wednesday)
08-05-2016 (Sunday)
11-05-2016 (Wednesday)
3:15pm - 4:15pm

What Happened Before the Big Bang
They are the biggest questions that science can possibly ask: where did everything in our universe come from? How did it all begin?

For nearly a hundred years, we thought we had the answer: a big bang some 14 billion years ago. But now some scientists believe that was not really the beginning. Our universe may have had a life before this violent moment of creation.

In What Happened Before the Big Bang, Horizon takes the ultimate trip into the unknown, to explore a dizzying world of cosmic bounces, rips and multiple universes, and finds out what happened before the big bang.
 

The Hunt for the Higgs
The programme goes behind the scenes at CERN to follow one of the most epic and expensive scientific quests of all time: the search for the Higgs particle, believed to give mass to everything in our universe.

However, the hunt for Higgs is part of a much grander search for how the universe works. It promises to help answer questions like why we exist and is a vital part of a Grand Unified Theory of nature. At the heart of the pursuit of the elusive particle is the same feature that makes snowflakes beautiful and human faces attractive: the simple and enchanting idea of symmetry.

 

Curriculum Links: S4-S6 Physics Elective Part "Astronomy and Space Science" and "Atomic World"

Venue: Lecture Hall, Hong Kong Science Museum
Language: English narration with Chinese subtitles
Enquiries: 2732 3223 (Mon to Fri: 9:00 am to 1:00 pm, 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm, except public holidays)
Free admission on a first come, first served basis

 

Film Title Date Time
The Voyage that Shock the World 05-06-2016 (Sunday)
22-06-2016 (Wednesday)
2:00pm - 3:00pm
One Degree Matters 05-06-2016 (Sunday)
22-06-2016 (Wednesday)
3:15pm - 4:15pm
Cuttlefish – The Brainy Bunch 15-06-2016 (Wednesday)
29-06-2016 (Wednesday)
2:00pm - 3:00pm
Lizard Kings 15-06-2016 (Wednesday)
29-06-2016 (Wednesday)
3:15pm - 4:15pm

The Voyage That Shook The World
In 1831 a young amateur scientist, Charles Darwin, boarded HMS Beagle on an epic five-year voyage of discovery. Since then more than 150 years has passed since Darwin published his famous "Origin of Species" and it is still regarded as one of the founding theories in Evolution. This programme retraces Darwin's journey, exploring the places and discoveries crucial to the formulation of his Theory of Evolution.

One Degree Matters
Presenting the latest science on climate change, this is an informative and inspirational documentary which offers realistic solutions and gives the reality of global warming a human face, showcasing amazing examples of individuals and communities tackling the world's environmental problems. The programme takes its lead from an exclusive group of influential international leaders as they travel to the Arctic to witness climate change at first hand.

Cuttlefish - The Brainy Bunch
Cuttlefish are the one of the strangest animals on our planet. Leading expert Dr. Mark Norman reveals how these shape-shifting champions can hypnotise their prey, impersonate the other sex and even turn out to be deadly. Cuttlefish have the largest brain to body ratio of all invertebrates. But does this mean they are intelligent? Can they learn and remember complex new tricks? This awards-winning programme brings to the surface the spectacular pyrotechnics of these clever creatures and what they can teach us about our own wits.

Lizard Kings
They look like dragons. Armed with sharp teeth, tearing claws and a whip-like tail, these fearsome creatures are not only powerful, they're also smart. Top predators with intelligence, who learn as they hunt, and who use their brain to track down prey, no matter what.

Sounds like these cunning hunters should be a big-brained mammal, but these creatures are reptiles, members of a family that evolved when the dinosaurs roamed the earth. They are the largest lizards still walking the planet, the monitor lizards - the Lizard Kings.

Ranging in size from the 3-metre long Komodo Dragon to the 20-cm short Pygmy Monitor, this huge scale range within a single genus - roughly the difference in body mass between an elephant and a mouse - is unmatched by any other group of terrestrial animals.

 

Curriculum Links: S1-S3 Science "Looking at Living Things", S4-S6 Biology Compulsory Part "Organisms and Environment" and Elective Part "Applied Ecology"

Venue: Lecture Hall, Hong Kong Science Museum
Language: English narration with Chinese subtitles
Enquiries: 2732 3223 (Mon to Fri: 9:00 am to 1:00 pm, 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm, except public holidays)
Free admission on a first come, first served basis

 

 

Last Modified: 31-03-2016

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