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Hong Kong Filmography Series

The Hong Kong Filmography Series is an attempt to chronicle some ninety years of Hong Kong cinema and history in a series of publications providing key information such as the genre, language, production companies, cast and crew, directors' notes, illustrated by precious film stills. A film list and indices are also appended. Eight volumes of the Filmographies have already been released, featuring over 7,000 fiction films and documentaries produced between 1914 and 1979.

Hong Kong Filmography Volume VIII (1975–1979)
New Release

Hong Kong Filmography Volume VIII (1975–1979) (In Chinese)

Sex and violence are generally what comes to mind when 1970s Hong Kong cinema is concerned, but movies of all genres, in fact, were undergoing various changes during the mid-to-late 1970s. Chang Cheh, the man responsible for the onset of the "Wuxia Century", also set off the "Kung Fu Kid Fever" with Disciples of Shaolin (1975) starring Alexander Fu Sheng. Chor Yuen adapted Gu Long's wuxia novels into quirky and poetic films, while King Hu travelled to Korea to film the unconventional Raining in the Mountain (1979) and Legend of the Mountain (1979). In the meantime, Li Han-hsiang's films about scamming and sex set off a trend of small productions which many filmmakers followed at a time when gimmicks were all the rage. Paradoxically, he then regained the courage to revert to large-scale productions and came up with The Empress Dowager (1975) and The Last Tempest (1976). This was also a time of transition from the old to the new, with the emergence of Lau Kar-leung and Sammo Hung, who were previously martial arts choreographers, as well as other novice directors, injecting new life into the industry.

Superstar comedian, Michael Hui, took comedy to new heights with works such as The Private Eyes (1976) during a time when social realist films rose to popularity, while Jackie Chan made his big break with kung fu comedies. The seeds of the cop-and-robber, action and gangster film trend were also sown, enabling these genres to flourish in the 1980s. Local movies were no longer defined as "Cantonese-language features" or "Mandarin-language features", undergoing a dramatic transformation to become "Hong Kong films" which possessed both home-grown flavour and international marketability.

Hong Kong Filmography Volume VIII compiles information on more than 800 Hong Kong-produced feature and documentary films from 1975 to 1979. 524 pages with 16 pages of full-colour posters. Published in 2014, priced at HK$285. (Edited by Kwok Ching-ling)

ISBN 978-962-8050-69-7

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香港影片大全第七卷(1970-1974)

Hong Kong Filmography Volume VII
(1970–1974)
(In Chinese)

The early and mid-1970s were the boom years for Mandarin films in Hong Kong’s cinematic history. After Shaw Brothers (Hong Kong) Ltd shut down its Cantonese film unit in the early 1960s, Mandarin productions were catapulted to new heights in the local film scene. Studios big and small jumped on the bandwagon, running to and fro between Hong Kong and Taiwan to produce a considerable number of Taiwan-made Hong Kong movies.

During the time when Shaw Brothers (SB) bestrode the industry, Golden Harvest (HK) Limited, helmed by ex-SB production manager Raymond Chow, was established in 1970 with comprehensive production and marketing strategies. From 1971 to 1973, the studio introduced several Bruce Lee titles. Their worldwide success laid a firm foundation for the newly founded film kingdom which would become a major force to be reckoned with.

In the late 1960s, the onslaught of violent kungfu pictures and erotic movies presented a huge challenge to the censors. As a matter of course, these shoddily made works soon lost their appeal and had to make way for the new trends that would emerge. Li Han-hsiang closed his Grand Motion Picture Company in Taiwan and embarked on a series of fraud flicks and fengyue films (softcore erotica) upon returning to Hong Kong. Among other money-spinners were comedies starring Michael Hui, who would kick-start the boom of the Hui Brothers’ comedies with a distinctly modern sensibility. Chor Yuen, an auteur who set trends for Hong Kong cinema time and again, boldly came up with the Cantonese crowd-puller The House of 72 Tenants (1973). This runaway hit, owing much to the mass popularity of Cantonese television actors, gave Cantonese cinema a new lease of life.

Hong Kong Filmography Volume VII collects information on more than 900 Hong Kong-produced feature and documentary films from 1970 to 1974. 464 pages with 16 pages of full-colour posters. Published in 2010, priced at HK$185. (Co-edited by Kwok Ching-ling and Shen Biri)

ISBN 978-962-8050-54-3

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香港影片大全第六卷(1965-1969)

 

Hong Kong Filmography Volume VI
(1965-1969)
(In Chinese)

Up until the mid-to-late 1960s, going to the movies was still the most staple entertainment for the general public. Despite the social unrest caused by mass riots in 1967, Hong Kong's film industry made a swift recovery, treating the audience to the delights of widescreen cinema in glorious colours. With the establishment of its own colour processing workshop, Shaw Brothers (Hong Kong) Ltd went from strength to strength, and consolidated the dominance of Mandarin films in the market. By contrast, Cantonese films were lagging behind with new social trends and taste. In the midst of drastic downsizing of productions, some dedicated Cantonese film veterans took their vocation even more seriously, and came up with meticulously crafted works. However, for practical reasons, the Hong Kong film industry diverted resources to developing the Taiwanese market.

Hong Kong in the 1960s was a time of tremendous economic growth and social evolution. The baby-boomer generation created a demand for more youthful and urban film culture. Both Mandarin and Cantonese films tried to cater to this young audience by making chic, cosmopolitan drama, lively youth films packed with song and dance, and even socially conscious works that tackled the problems of rebellious or delinquent youth. On another front, a revolution was taking place in colour wuxia films, thanks to trailblazers like King Hu and Chang Cheh. Their bold recreation of the martial arts world, their innovations in action choreography and unique aesthetics of violence took the genre to dizzying heights of artistic achievement and (sometimes) commercial success. Contemporary detective and action films also thrived as variations on this genre.

Hong Kong Filmography Volume VI (1965-1969) has compiled a database of some 900 titles of both fiction and documentary films made between 1965 and 1969. 452 pages thick with 16 colour poster stills. Hardcover. Published in 2007, priced at HK$265. (Edited by Kwok Ching-ling)

ISBN 962-8050-42-7

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香港影片大全第五卷(1960-1964)

 

Hong Kong Filmography Volume V
(1960-1964)
(In Chinese)

Cantonese cinema reaped a bumper harvest during the early and mid-1960s, thriving on the advent of technological and cinematic advances of the earlier decades. Yet the growing market dominance enjoyed by the Mandarin cinema under the big studio system foreshadowed the dramatic decline of the Cantonese cinema towards the end of the decade.

As for Cantonese cinema, Kong Ngee actively sought territorial expansion in the mid-1960s and set up a string of subsidiaries. Chun Kim, a key player at the Union, joined Kong Ngee to become its flag-bearer. The transition the cinema was undergoing at that time coincided with the transfer of directorial talents necessary for the continuation of the lineage. Lan Kwong Film Company, the latest contender, launched production in 1959. Its family melodramas left the terrain of the extended feudal family to address issues pertinent to the nuclear family and hit a nerve with contemporary audiences.

Period films took a liking to the Cantonese opera and martial arts genres. Cantonese opera films attempted to reinvigorate itself by injecting lustrous stage elements such as the 'hair-flinging' and 'round walking' techniques into war-period features. The popularity that the Wong Fei-hung series enjoyed in the 1950s when an overwhelming 60 titles were produced was drawn to a close. Adaptations of 'new style' martial arts novels quickly filled the void.

The rivalry between Shaw Brothers and MP & GI raised the standard of Mandarin filmmaking to an unprecedented height. However, independent studios were worst hit by the onslaught of the Big Two. The era also witnessed the rise to fame of Li Han-hsiang, whose influence towered over the development of Mandarin cinema with the addition of the grandeur palace epics Yang Kwei Fei, The Magnificent Concubine (1962) and Empress Wu Tse-tien (1963) to the Shaw repertoire, and his unique language of aesthetic crafted in the huangmei diao opera film, The Love Eterne (1963). Great Wall and Feng Huang, two left-wing studios, mounted a formidable defence. Unswayed by the huangmei diao craze, the studios released a string of Yue opera films, including Bride Hunter (1960) and The Princess Falls in Love (1962), and featured its star attraction Hsia Moon whose singing was dubbed by a mainland prima donna.

Hong Kong Filmography Volume V documents over 1,200 fiction films and documentaries produced between 1960 and 1964. 560 pages thick with 24 colour poster stills. Hardcover. Published in 2005, priced at HK$225. (Edited by Kwok Ching-ling)

ISBN 962-8050-31-1

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香港影片大全第四卷(1953-1959)

香港影片大全第四卷(1953-1959)

Hong Kong Filmography Volume IV
(1953-1959)


The 1950s was a prosperous period in the history of Hong Kong cinema, giving rise to flourishing film genres, techniques, and highly skilled personnel. The audience was dazzled by rich doses of melodramatic realist, martial arts, comedy, and Cantonese opera films, to name but a few. For the first time, the monotonous black and white screen was livening up by the emergence of 3-D, Scope and colour films. The rise of dialect films represented an interest in expanding the root and culture of overseas Chinese, a sentiment shared by the filmmakers and audience alike.

Hong Kong Filmography Volume IV documents the 1,694 fiction films and documentaries produced between 1953 and 1959. Published in 2003 in separate Chinese (540 pages) and English (696 pages) editions. Hardcover. Priced at HK$210 each. (Edited by Kwok Ching-ling)

Chinese edition: ISBN 962-8050-18-4
English edition: ISBN 962-8050-19-2

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香港影片大全第三卷(1950-1952)

 

Hong Kong Filmography Volume III
(1950-1952)


As a legatee of the traditions of the 1940s, Hong Kong cinema in the 1950s continued to produce fantasy martial arts pictures, melodramas and comedies. These genres remained the mainstays of the industry. Not a few were adapted from so-called 'airwave novels'. Among the most distinguished productions of the period were Dawn Must Come (aka Tears of the Pearl River), Kaleidoscope, The Dividing Wall, and Modern Red Chamber Dream.

The 761-page Hong Kong Filmography Vol III (1950-1952) records the details of over 580 films from 1950 to 1952. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 2000. Hardcover. Priced at HK$223. Currently out of stock. (Edited by Winnie Fu)

ISBN 962-8050-08-7

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香港影片大全第二卷(1942-1949)


Hong Kong Filmography Volume II
(1942-1949)


The Hong Kong Filmography Volume II (1942-1949) records over 430 fiction films and documentaries in its 559-page edition. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 1998. Hardcover. Priced at HK$235. Currently out of stock. (Edited by Winnie Fu)

ISBN 962-8050-05-2

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香港影片大全第一卷(1913-1941)


Hong Kong Filmography Volume I
(1913-1941)


The Hong Kong Filmography Volume I (1913-1941) records some 600 pre-war local productions in its 696-page edition. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 1997. Hardcover. Priced at HK$235. Currently out of stock. (Edited by Mary Wong).

ISBN 962-8050-03-6

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Oral History Series

The Oral History Project undertaken by our Research Unit is a documentation of interviews with Hong Kong film veterans by means of digital and A/V technology, which serves as the basis for further researches and thematic publications. The 'Oral History Series' contains also precious photos and filmographies of individual filmmakers.

The Cold War and Hong Kong Cinema

Oral History Series (6): Director Lung Kong

Patrick Lung Kong, one of the leading reformers of Hong Kong cinema, is an actor-turned-writer/director who made his name in the late 1960s when Cantonese cinema was at its lowest. His celebrated titles, such as The Story of a Discharged Prisoner, Teddy Girls, and Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow, delivered a gritty portrayal of sensitive social issues at the time with brand new cinematics. From then on, his films have been characterised by the co-existence of populist sentimentality and a mission to educate.

In the 1970s, Lung Kong set out to examine the psyche of modern people in his melodramas. Elements of psychoanalysis and a realist middle-class sensibility are evident in these works. Later, he broke away from Hong Kong with Hiroshima 28 and Mitra to present his statements on mankind and global ethics, as well as the prevailing sense of loss and insecurity in Hong Kong and other modern societies. Such cross-border consciousness was well ahead of its time, while reflecting Hong Kong people's rising confidence and their hope of finding themselves a place in the global community.

In retrospect, Lung Kong is indeed a flag bearer in the reform of Hong Kong cinema in the 1960s and 70s. His films also bear witness to the local consciousness and the various issues that arose while Hong Kong was on its way to becoming a modern city. He is a man of vision who bridges the past to the present.

This volume documents the life story of Lung Kong compiled from several interviews the Hong Kong Film Archive conducted over the past years. Also included are essays by famed critics and scholars who expound their views on his works.

Published in March 2010. Priced at HK$120. Bilingual in Chinese and English (English edition in CD-ROM). (Co-edited by Angel Shing and Lau Yam)

ISBN 962-8050-52-4

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Oral History Series

Oral History Series (5):
An Emerging Modernity: Hong Kong Cinema of the 1960s
(In Chinese)

The 1960s was a prolific period in the development of Hong Kong cinema, both in terms of number of productions and variety of genres. The subject matter and means of expression fully mirrored the cultural landscape and metropolitan sophistication of Hong Kong well on its way to becoming a modern city.

This volume puts together a series of interviews with eminent filmmakers—Wong Cheuk-hon and Law Bun, founders of Lan Kwong and Hong Kong film companies respectively; Helena Law Lan and Suet Nei, star actresses of the two studios; directors Ling Wan, Wong Yiu, Peter Pan Lei and Ho Meng-hua; screenwriters Szeto On and Yip Yut-fong. Also featured are analyses and feature articles by renowned scholars and critics. All of these gather to project an overview of a rapidly changing era in Hong Kong cinema—the emergence of youth dramas, the wuxia boom, the rise of Mandarin cinema, and the revolution in film language, etc.

In the 'Photo Album' section, Winnie Fu presents a social portrait by showing film stills alongside photos of old Hong Kong; Wong Ain-ling looks back on two memorably charming actresses, Ting Ying and Suet Nei, as well as two unique film genres, Chinese opera and melodrama.
Contains 356 pages. Published in 2008. Priced at HK$120. In Chinese. (Edited by Kwok Ching-ling)
ISBN 962-8050-47-8

Oral History Series

Oral History Series (4): Director Wong Tin-lam (In Chinese)

Wizard-director Wong Tin-lam has worked in a wide variety of genres throughout his career. Cantonese martial arts fantasy and folktale were the mainstays of his early works, but it was his contemporary films, particularly the musical, light comedy and melodrama he directed for Hsin Hwa, MP & GI/Cathay in the 1950s and 60s, that came to be recognised as his real gems. Wong joined the TV industry in the 1970s, poised to write a new chapter of his remarkable career as a trendsetter in this infant business. In addition to his own accounts of yesteryears, the meetings with his son Wong Jing and protégés David Lam, Ringo Lam and Johnnie To have documented the lineage tracing back to the master himself. The monograph also publishes a collection of his column that ran in T.V. Week in the 1970s and 80s. Offering personal anecdotes and hard-to-find records of post-war Hong Kong cinema, the monograph promises to be a fun read.

264 pages in total. Published in 2007. Priced at HK$110. In Chinese. (Co-edited by Wong Ain-ling and Angel Shing)

ISBN 962-8050-44-3


Oral History Series
Oral History Series

Oral History Series (3): Director Chor Yuen

A multi-talented film veteran whose presence remains strongly felt all along his 30-year career, Chor Yuen has opened up exciting vistas in Hong Kong cinema. The social realist in The Great Devotion (1960), the idealised melodrama Rose in Tears (1963), the action-packed Black Rose (1965), the farcical Pregnant Maiden (1968), the erotic Intimate Confessions of a Chinese Courtesan (1972), the lucrative Gu Long martial arts novel adaptations–a truly kaleidoscopic oeuvre embracing virtually every genre. Adding to the director's recollection of his days from Kong Ngee to Shaws are reviews and his complete filmography. Published in 2006. Priced at HK$95 for English edition; HK$70 for Chinese edition. (Co-edited by Grace Ng and Kwok Ching-ling)

Chinese edition: ISBN 962-8050-34-6
English edition: ISBN 962-8050-35-4

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Oral History Series

Oral History Series (2): An Age of Idealism: Great Wall & Feng Huang Days

Nine film veterans who joined Great Wall or Feng Huang film companies in the 1950s tell the saga of how a group of filmmakers, labelled left-wingers at the time, realised the ideals and expectations that they had of their country and societal developments in the course of momentous historical changes. The Chapter 'Filmdom Anecdotes' written by George Shen contains detailed information on Yuen Yang-an, a key figure in early Great Wall days. 416 pages with over a hundred precious photos. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 2001, priced at HK$120. (Edited by Wong Ain-ling)

ISBN 962-8050-14-1

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Oral History Series

Oral History Series (1): Hong Kong Here I Come

Eight veterans of the Hong Kong and Chinese film industries tell film history as they see it from the early days of the 30s and 40s on the Mainland to their migration to Hong Kong.

The eight veterans are actresses Chin Tsi-ang and Li Lihua, actor/director Lo Dun, director Griffin Yue Feng and Wu Pang, cinematographer Ho Look-ying, producer Tong Yuejuan and screenwriter/lyricist Chen Dieyi.
226 pages with over a hundred precious photos and filmographies of the veterans. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 2000, priced at $75. Currently out of stock. (Edited by Kwok Ching-ling)

ISBN 962-8050-07-9

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The Chaozhou-dialect Films of Hong Kong
 
The Chaozhou-dialect Films of Hong Kong
 

 

Always in the Dark: A Study of Hong Kong Gangster Films

Gangster films came on the scene during the 1970s when Hong Kong’s economy began to take off. The city’s heyday was also the period these mafia dramas reigned. Despite being an integral part of Hong Kong cinema, the gangster film has hardly ever been singled out for study. This volume sets out to present a holistic view of the gangster film from multiple angles, including its roots in Chinese culture, the influence from foreign movies, its varied faces during different stages of development, and a who’s who in this distinctive cinema. An attempt to trace how these works on criminals and their lives have evolved into a major film genre in Hong Kong.

236 pages with English edition in CD-ROM. Published in March 2014. Priced at HK$130. (Edited by Po Fung)

ISBN 978-962-8050-68-0

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Merry-Go-Movies: Star Kids of HK Cinema in the 50s and 60s
 

 

Merry-Go-Movies: Star Kids of HK Cinema in the 50s and 60s

For child actors from the 50s and 60s, their film appearance brings them something beyond stardom, The achievement of child actors is an exceptional one. Even their actual life experience was so brief in terms of age, they were talented enough to give vivid and touching performances. They might be young but they play a crucial role in films that was as important as any supporting actor. Growing up with great perseverance, stamina and maturity, many of these child actors have achieved extraordinary success after their child-acting years, and are ideal role models for children nowadays. With over 200 precious photos, the book includes oral history interviews of the grown-up child stars, some facts of the child actors’ and selected filmography.

264 pages. In Chinese only. First edition released in Jan 2014. Priced at HK$ 80.00. (Edited by Cecilia Wong)

ISBN 978-962-8050-67-3

The Chaozhou-dialect Films of Hong Kong
 

 

The Chaozhou-dialect Films of Hong Kong
(In Chinese)

After World War II, Hong Kong was not only the production base for motion pictures in Cantonese and Mandarin, it also experienced a boom of Amoy- and Chaozhou-dialect film-making. In 1955, Fanny Ha founded the Tuojiang Film Company, ushering in a new trend with Hong Kong’s first ever Chaozhou-dialect film, The Story of Wang Jinlong. Its success became the driving force for many film workers who ventured into the business one after another.

Later in the 1960s, Chaozhou-dialect features burst onto the scene in the form of opera films, amounting to as many as 160 titles in just a matter of years. Films shot in this dialect were primarily targeted for Chaozhouese populations in Southeast Asian regions such as Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand, whereas Hong Kong also constituted a considerable market. In recent years, however, this page of Hong Kong film history has gradually faded into oblivion.

Further to The Amoy-dialect Films of Hong Kong published in 2012, this volume carries essays by film scholars and aficionados who explore the sociopolitical factors behind the rise of Chaozhou cinema and its subsequent development. There are also discourses on the artistic character of this dialect cinema, and on its links with traditional theatre. The oral history section features interviews with some movers and shakers in the industry, namely Xia Fan, the pioneer of Chaozhou film, famed actors Chen Chuhui, Cheung Ying-yin, Chen Wenchang, Chen Lili, together with director Law Chi. Also included are a filmography of Hong Kong-made Chaozhou-dialect productions compiled from a wealth of literature and audiovisual materials, as well as profiles of major filmmakers.

276 pages in total. Published in September 2013. Priced at HK$180. (Edited by May Ng)

ISBN 978-962-8050-66-6

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A Touch of Magic: Veteran Set Designers Chan Ki-yui & Chan King-sam
 

 

A Touch of Magic: Veteran Set Designers Chan Ki-yui & Chan King-sam

The importance of set designers is often underestimated by our younger generation. During the years of studio productions, set designers are the magicians who built worlds of fantasy visualized by directors. They were born with imaginative minds and great capacities. Chan Ki-yui and Chan King-sam are the best of the fantastical best. With a combined career that spanned from 1930s to 1980s, the father and son have amassed between them a record of over 1,000 sets of films, and for a wide spectrum of genres.

Technology advanced throughout the years, and massive use of computer-generated graphics becomes inevitable. Studio sets have yet to serve another generation before it became less important. As a tribute to embrace the craftsmanship by the Chans, the book includes 5 parts: the exhibition, oral history interviews, newspaper clippings, critics, and the selected filmography.

212 pages. In Chinese only. First edition released in March 2013. HK$ 110.00. (Edited by Cecilia Wong)

ISBN 978-962-8050-64-2

Golden Harvest: Leading Change in Changing Times
 
 

 

Golden Harvest: Leading Change in Changing Times

The 1970s were a time when the baby-boomer generation entered adolescence and Hong Kong cinema underwent a major transition. Golden Harvest was one of the film companies that came on the scene during that period. With a flexible mode of operation, Golden Harvest gave free rein to its filmmakers and let their talents shine. It quickly rose to prominence as the biggest player in the industry, opening up global markets and bringing out a wealth of quality productions throughout the years.

Golden Harvest: Leading Change in Changing Times traces the studio’s development and its varied achievements with a collection of essays and oral history interviews, supplemented by filmmakers’ biographies, and more.

308 pages with English edition in CD-ROM. Published in March 2013. Priced at HK$140. (Co-edited by Po Fung and Lau Yam)

ISBN 978-962-8050-65-9

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The Cinema of Lee Tit
 

 

The Cinema of Lee Tit

Lee-tit (1913-1996), one of Cantonese cinema’s top directors, is known for his versatility. Be it adaptations of Cantonese opera, genre films or films addressing social issues, Lee shows great originality and agility. Lee was also well versed in the vocabulary of film, which he animated into effective and often powerful storytelling. The book includes seven essays on Lee’s works and in-depth interviews with Lee and his son, offering personal and little-known anecdotes of his career.

152 pages. Published in 2013. In Chinese. Priced at HK$54 (Co-edited by Sam Ho and Ernest Chan)

ISBN 978-962-8050-63-5
Mastering Virtue: The Cinematic Legend of a Martial Artist
 

 

The Amoy-dialect Films of Hong Kong
(In Chinese)

Since A Belated Encounter went into production in 1947, Hong Kong had at one time become the production centre of motion pictures in the Amoy dialect from Fujian, a coastal province in southeast China. From the 1950s to the mid-1960s, over 200 titles were made with the backing of Chinese merchants in the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore and Taiwan. While starring actors of Fujianese descent living in Hong Kong, these movies were shot by local filmmakers and distributed to Southeast Asian countries populated by Fujianese. And since they were hardly ever exhibited here in Hong Kong, this collection of b-grade pictures has eluded the attention of local film scholars.

The Amoy-dialect Films of Hong Kong features essays by researchers and experts both local and overseas, elucidating the trajectory and characteristics of this regional cinema from the perspectives of history, culture, and music. Also included are oral history interviews with star actors Chong Sit Fong, Seow Kuen (better known as Ivy Ling Bo) and Wong Ching-ho, etc. A list of Hong Kong-produced Amoy-dialect pictures from 1947 to the mid-1960s is appended at the end.

264 pages in total. Published in March 2012. Priced at HK$160. In Chinese. (Edited by May Ng)

ISBN 978-962-8050-62-8

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Mastering Virtue: The Cinematic Legend of a Martial Artist
 
 

 

Mastering Virtue: The Cinematic Legend of a Martial Artist

The myth of Wong Fei-hung, a Guangdong boxer in late Qing/Early Republican China, has provided filmmakers with a rich vein of cinematic lore. Ever since its debut in 1949, the Wong Fei-hung film series has run to over 100 separate features. Before Bruce Lee took the world by storm with his martial prowess, it was Wong Fei-hung, first played by Kwan Tak-hing, who set the pace in Hong Kong action filmmaking.

Wong Fei-hung films, unlike the average chopsocky actioner, are not just about fists and kicks; they are informed by shades of Confucian morals, which set them apart from Cantonese movies of the 1950s and 60s. Today, many characters from the series are fondly remembered as famous icons of Hong Kong popular culture.

This first-of-its-kind monograph examines the cinema of Wong Fei-hung in terms of its historical background, artistic characteristics, and the workings of film genres. Also included are comments by Wong’s disciples on Hung Fist, a martial art practised by the master, as seen in various filmic interpretations over the decades.

236 pages with English edition in CD-ROM. Published in March 2012. Priced at HK$125. (Co-edited by Po Fung and Lau Yam)

ISBN 978-962-8050-61-1

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Hong Kong Memories in Cinema
 
The Chaozhou-dialect Films of Hong Kong
 

 

Hong Kong Memories in Cinema

Hong Kong Memories in Cinema is a project that spanned two years in commemoration of Hong Kong Film Archive’s 10th anniversary. Alongside the monograph, there is a DVD which carries precious footage of Hong Kong from the first half of the 20th century and the post-World War II years. The footage is accompanied by reviews and commentaries from scholars of the Centre for Humanities Research, Lingnan University of Hong Kong.

184 pages. DVD and catalogue. Published in 2012. Bilingual  in Chinese and English. Priced at HK$98. (Edited by Winnie Fu)

ISBN 978-962-8050-56-7
Chinese Cinema: Tracing the Origins
 
 

 

Chinese Cinema: Tracing the Origins

This volume of essays is named Chinese Cinema: Tracing the Origins. As the name suggests, the aim is to discover the ancestral roots of Chinese motion pictures. ‘Origins of Chinese Cinema’, the first part of the book, is a journey of methodically tracing the origins in question. Traversing from China’s first movie to Hong Kong’s first movie, the authors attempt to explicate and re-examine with historical data the behind-the-scene story and significance of how these works have become film history classics. The second part, ‘Industry and Art’, provides a sketch of early Chinese motion pictures which surfaces while unearthing historical materials. It also ponders on the conceptual and artistic aspects of Chinese cinema in its primordial state. The CD that comes with the volume collects valuable resources – in Chinese is origins-related material, in English is information about film pioneer Benjamin Brodsky.

266 pages with reference materials in CD-ROM. Published in 2011. Priced at HK$105. All essays in Chinese. (Edited by Wong Ain-ling)

ISBN 978-962-8050-60-4

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Kuei Chih-hung, the Rebel in the System
 

 

Kuei Chih-hung, the Rebel in the System

Kuei Chih-hung is an important director at Shaw Brothers in the 1970s, whose works span a wide spectrum of genres – martial arts, musicals, erotica, and most notably, crime thrillers and horror films. Through strikingly daring stories and a dazzling style, his sensational, bizarre portrayal of human evils creates a cinema uniquely his own.

120 pages. Published in 2011. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Priced at HK$54. (Co-edited by Sam Ho and Li Cheuk-to)

ISBN 978-962-8050-59-8

One for All: The Union Film Spirit

 

One for All: The Union Film Spirit

The Union Film Enterprise Ltd (1952–1967) set out to revamp Cantonese cinema during its days, leaving behind a rich body of quality works as a standard-bearer for Cantonese filmmaking. Its abiding influence is still felt today, and the studio has become part of Hong Kong’s collective memory. ‘All for one and one for all,’ the celebrated quote from In the Face of Demolition (1953), best encapsulates the Union Film Spirit. This volume collects essays by scholars and critics who examine the success and failure of Union Film from the perspectives of history, culture and aesthetics.

Published in March 2011. Priced at HK$93. Bilingual in Chinese and English (English edition in CD-ROM). (Edited by Grace Ng)

ISBN 978-962-8050-58-1

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The Mission: Sun Luen Films
 

 

The Mission: Sun Luen Films

Film studios Great Wall, Feng Huang and Sun Luen, the base camp of leftist filmmaking in the 1950s and 1960s, played a pivotal role in the history of Hong Kong cinema. Founded in 1952, Sun Luen specialised in Cantonese productions and, over the course of 30 years, released some 100 titles in a quest to fulfil its artistic and political missions. This volume is a preliminary study of the studio which includes essays, interviews and reference materials.

232 pages. Published in 2011. In Chinese. Priced at HK$66. (Edited by Sam Ho)

ISBN 978-962-8050-57-4

The Cold War and Hong Kong Cinema

Fei Mu's Confucius

The discovery and subsequent restoration of Confucius (1940) has filled a void in Chinese film history. Other than remembrances from Barbara Fei and Serena Jin, daughters of the film's director and producer respectively, this volume features essays by distinguished scholars and critics who look at the film from various perspectives, by turns historical, aesthetic, musical, and cultural. Also included are articles written by Fei Mu himself and Qin Pengzhang, the one who scored the film's music.

Published in April 2010. Priced at HK$78. Bilingual in Chinese and English. (Edited by Wong Ain-ling)

ISBN 962-8050-53-2

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The Cold War and Hong Kong Cinema

Eileen Chang: MP & GI Screenplays
(In Chinese)

A film lover, a critic as well as a scriptwriter, Eileen Chang's life was intricately entwined with film. Her scriptwriting career first started in Shanghai, and developed further in Hong Kong later, when she wrote screenplays for Motion Picture & General Investment Co Ltd until the studio underwent a major reshuffle in 1964. During her eight-year collaboration with MP & GI, she penned a total of ten scripts, eight of which brought to the screen. It might not have been a prolific stage in her creative career, this collection of screenplays holds a special place in her literary legacy nonetheless.

As these screenplays reveal, Eileen Chang in the cinematic world is still the worldly-wise, sharp-witted Eileen Chang familiar to us all. What makes these screenplays valuable is, however, an enthralling sense of humour that is rarely found in her novels. Except the script of Dream of the Red Mansion which cannot be traced, this volume collects all the screenplays Chang wrote for MP & GI, together with essays by renowned scholars and writers.

The Eileen Chang: MP & GI Screenplays box set contains four separate books. Published in 2010.
Priced at HK$190. In Chinese. (Edited by Grace Ng)

ISBN 962-8050-51-6

The Cold War and Hong Kong Cinema

The Cold War and Hong Kong Cinema
(In Chinese)

The Cold War was an important event that affected the whole world. As a British colony torn between two contending regimes across the Straits, Hong Kong naturally became a battlefield where opposing ideological forces clashed and collided. Strangely enough, traces of cold war politics were rarely found in Hong Kong cinema, largely a result of the colonial government's stringent control over film censorship in its attempt to maintain a precarious peace among feuding factions. This is indeed ironic, yet at the same time indicative of the very nature of this unprecedented warfare—ideology mattered above all. On another front, filmmakers were also able to work their ways around the rules, offering covert ideological messages in their works.

The Cold War and Hong Kong Cinema is a collection of essays by scholars and researchers who participated in 'The Cold War Factor in Hong Kong Cinema' symposium jointly presented by the HKFA and the Centre of Asian Studies, The University of Hong Kong, in 2006. Writers have analysed in historical, cultural and social terms the connections between Cold War and Hong Kong cinema.

308 pages in total. Published in June 2009. Priced at HK$157. In Chinese. (Co-edited by Wong Ain-ling and Lee Pui-tak)

ISBN 962-8050-50-8

Cathay box set
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Cathay box set

The Cathay Story, Revised Edition

Cathay/MP & GI was a star-studded film studio priding itself on its kaleidoscopic oeuvre. This revised edition contains three more interviews with its star actors Grace Chang, Kelly Lai Chen, and Peter Dunn. Contains 328 pages. In Chinese with a CD-ROM providing the English translation of all articles. Published in March 2009. (Edited by Wong Ain-ling)

ISBN 962-8050-48-6

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Evan Yang's Autobiography

Evan Yang's Autobiography
(In Chinese)


A Cathay writer-director with a distinguished scholarly quality, Evan Yang (1920-1978) had made such celebrated works as Mambo Girl, Air Hostess, and Forever Yours. This volume is compiled from his manuscripts and photos recently donated by his family. Contains 154 pages. Published in March 2009. In Chinese. (Written by Evan Yang; edited by Grace Ng)

ISBN 962-8050-49-4

Priced at HK$200 per box set.

Collective Memories in Movie Posters

Collective Memories in Movie Posters

Zhu Shilin: A Filmmaker of His Times

Throughout his film career, Zhu Shilin (1899-1967) did not resign himself to drifting with the tide, but stayed true to his passion and tactfully rode out the turbulent waves of history with unflagging perseverance. He, somewhat like a miracle, made himself a genuine auteur rarely found in Chinese cinema, reflecting both past and present, tradition and modernity. Back in his times, his works might have not been 'progressive' enough, but when seen today, they continue to charm while finding their way deep into the core of the Chinese psyche.

The book contains essays on the art and historical path of Zhu Shilin by reputed scholars and writers, plus interviews with Zhu's children and protégé Cen Fan. 256 pages in total. Published in 2008. In separate Chinese and English editions. Priced at HK$118. (Edited by Wong Ain-ling)

Chinese edition: ISBN 962-8050-45-1
English edition: ISBN 962-8050-46-X

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Collective Memories in Movie Posters

Collective Memories in Movie Posters

Collective Memories in Movie Posters

Delicate and cherished collective memories of Hong Kong cinema preserved in a 366-page desktop calendar, which contains the finest selection of film posters in the HKFA collection, and memorable quotes penned by prominent film critics and scholars, including Law Kar, Michael Lam, Li Cheuk-to, Neco Lo, Keeto Lam, William Cheung and Wong Ain-ling. A collector's gem and a must for the true film buff!

Printed in full colour, bilingual in Chinese and English, published in 2007, priced at HK$105. (Edited by Winnie Fu)

ISBN 962-8050-43-5

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Monographs of Hong Kong Film Veterans, Vol I - Hong Kong Here I come

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Li Han-hsiang, Storyteller

Sometimes enfant terrible, sometimes a hack of the Chinese speaking cinema, director Li Han-hsiang started and consolidated his filmmaking career in Hong Kong, self-exiled to Taiwan in the prime of his career in the mid-60s, returned to the ex-colony in the 70s, then steered majestically into the mainland with the liberalising of Chinese economy in the 80s. Li Han-hsiang, Storyteller comprises two sections: essays re-evaluating his rich, versatile and often controversial career, and revealing interviews of both Li himself and his collaborators. Published in 2007 in separate Chinese and English editions. Priced at HK$128 each. (Edited by Wong Ain-ling)

Chinese edition: ISBN 962-8050-40-0
English edition: ISBN 962-8050-41-9

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Monographs of Hong Kong Film Veterans, Vol I - Hong Kong Here I come

Frame After Frame
- A Retrospective on Hong Kong Animation


From her humble infancy in advertising and film opening credits, through short films, and onto features, the strenuous path of Hong Kong's animation has gone through a strenuous path, yet no less than a small miracle. Frame After Frame takes you on a colourful journey through the fields of animation in advertising, independent productions, television and feature films. The 160-page catalogue carries a number of essays and interviews. Printed in full colour, bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 2006. Priced at HK$120. (Edited by Winnie Fu)

ISBN 962-8050-39-7

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Monographs of Hong Kong Film Veterans, Vol I - Hong Kong Here I come

Monographs of Hong Kong Film Veterans, Vol I - Hong Kong Here I come

The Glorious Modernity of Kong Ngee

From 1955 to 1968, Kong Ngee Motion Picture Production Co made well over a hundred films, mostly urban and modern, with genres ranging from romantic comedies, melodramas, to detective films and psychological thrillers.

The monograph includes two major sections: essays by film scholars, critics and oral history interviews with Kong Ngee personalities such as Ho Kian-ngiap (of the Ho family), Chan Man (producer/director), Patrick Lung Kong (director), Tam Ning and Woo Mei-ping (scriptwriter), Patrick Tse Yin (actor), Patsy Kar Ling (actress), Nam Hung (actress). Published in 2006. Priced at HK$150 for English edition; HK$100 for Chinese edition. (Edited by Wong Ain-ling)

Chinese edition: ISBN 962-8050-37-0
English edition: ISBN 962-8050-38-9

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@Location

@location

Ever since the movie camera moved out of the studio into the city space, film directors, production managers, cinematographers and art directors have realised the challenge of using public space. This book takes you on a ride to experience stories behind interesting film locations, introducing us to the legendary figures and the cinematic miracles they helped realise. 188 pages printed in colour. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 2006. Priced at HK$125. (Edited by Winnie Fu)

ISBN 962-8050-36-2

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The Hong Kong - Guangdong Film Connection

The Hong Kong-Guangdong Film Connection

Hong Kong has always maintained a close-knit cultural, economical and political tie with its native province of Guangdong throughout the colonial era to the present. The colony was embroiled in cross-border turmoil such as the massive strike in the 1920s and the eight-year anti-Japanese war. Cantonese operatic arts and influential players, folk legends of Guangdong heroes and household names Wong Fei-hung and Chan Mung-kat, and the Lingnan culture thrived in Cantonese cinema during the post-war years, sending the creative spark flying in the territory.

The book is the first insightful retrospect of the dynamic and profound relationship between Hong Kong and Guangdong cinemas. Renowned scholar Li Yizhuang, cultural worker Reeve Wong and film critics Po Fung and Koo Siu-sun, among other contributors, offer their accounts of the people and places at this historical juncture that helped shape and redefine the cinemas of the two cities. Published in 2005 in separate Chinese and English editions. Priced at HK$110 for English edition; HK$75 for Chinese edition. (Edited by Wong Ain-ling)

Chinese edition: ISBN 962-8050-32-X
English edition: ISBN 962-8050-33-8

Further information

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A Yam Kim-fai Reader (In Chinese)

Hailed affectionately as the 'Opera Fans' Lover', Yam Kim-fai has made more than 300 films in her illustrious career, and has been a household name in Cantonese speaking communities across the world since the early 1950s. This long-overdue book, the first of its kind dedicated to the talented artist, includes a collection of articles written by well-known critics and scholars, and an interview with Yam's lifelong partner Pak Suet-sin. Cartoonist Honsanawong and French expatriate painter Christopher Cheung wielded brushes and ink to pay their tributes. A complete film list is appended. Published in 2004. Priced at HK$120. (Edited by Michael Lam)

ISBN 962-8050-30-3

2

'Fame Flame Frame - Jupiter Wong Foto Exhibition' Catalogue

Jupiter Wong's photos not only record a film and its shooting location, but also embed Jupiter's mood at that time and space. Once he got a camera in hand, Jupiter would think of himself as a film director and his pictures are actually his own directorial creation. Be it a director, a star, a crewmember or a stunt man in his pictures, there is always something happening around his focal point. The faces captured by him - be they melancholic, passionate, worried, excited, happy or sad, there is always a story to tell.

The Hong Kong Film Archive has finely selected over 300 of Jupiter's photos and compiled them into a publication titled 'Fame Flame Frame - Jupiter Wong Foto Exhibition', which goes in line with an exhibition organised at the HK Film Archive Exhibition Hall in September and October, 2004. Published in 2004. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Priced at HK$90, the 304-page photo catalogue covers four sections on film stills, star portraits, behind-the-scene images and black and white photos. Currently out of stock.
(Edited by Winnie Fu)

ISBN 962-8050-29-X

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2

The Cinema of Lee Sun-fung

Lee Sun-fung was one of the emblematic directors that predominated Cantonese cinema of the 50s and 60s. An intellectual himself, he not only directed, but also scripted many of his films, with quite a few adaptations from Western and Chinese classics. Particularly valuable are the director's notes he left behind that give us a glimpse of how filmmakers of his time deliberated over filmmaking and attempted to strike a balance between the market and their own ideals. Published in 2004 in separate Chinese and English editions. Priced at HK$100 each. (Edited by Wong Ain-ling)

Chinese edition: ISBN 962-8050-27-3
English edition: ISBN 962-8050-28-1

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Chang Cheh - A Memoir

Chang Cheh: A Memoir
(In English)

The late director Chang Cheh (1924-2002) was a key advocator of the 'new century of wuxia' movement in the Hong Kong cinema. In the Memoir, Chang unveils to the readers his rarely known childhood, his aspired involvement in politics in his earlier years, and the hit trends he brought about in momentous phases of the Hong Kong cinema. The book (260 pages) contains precious stills and photos of the director at work, a complete filmography, and a preface written by director John Woo and renowned film critic Sek Kei as a tribute to the late master. (Published in 2004; HK$80)

ISBN 962-8050-26-5

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Chang Cheh: Memoirs and Criticism

Chang Cheh: Memoirs and Criticism
(In Chinese)

Chang Cheh (1924-2002) started out penning film criticisms for newspapers and his astute writing paved the way for his prolific and glorious career working as a writer–director at Shaws, one of the leading studios at the time.

In the 'Memoirs' section of the book, Chang unveils to the readers his rarely known childhood, his aspired involvement in politics in his earlier years, and the hit trends he brought about in momentous phases of the Hong Kong cinema. The 'Criticism' section is a comprehensive collection of the over 100 reviews and criticisms on cinemas of the East and West Chang contributed to the press during the 1950s and 60s. His keen power of observation was well reciprocated in his later directorial works.

Chang Cheh: Memoirs and Criticism (368 pages) contains precious stills and photos of the director at work, a complete filmography, and a preface written by director John Woo and renowned film critic Sek Kei as a tribute to the late master. (Published in 2002; HK$100)

ISBN 962-8050-17-6

Further information

Cantonese Opera Film Retrospective

Cantonese Opera Film Retrospective (Revised Edition, 2003)

Revised edition of the out-of-print retrospective catalogue published in conjunction with the 11th Hong Kong International Film Festival in 1987: thematic essays on the genres, history and development of Cantonese opera and the ties forged with the cinema, together with newly edited profiles of Hong Kong filmmakers, programme notes and a comprehensive filmography of Cantonese productions released between 1946 and 1959. 212 pages. Bilingual in Chinese and English. HK$60. (Edited by Li Cheuk-to; collated by May Ng)

ISBN 962-8050-25-7

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The Diary of Lai Man-wai

The Diary of Lai Man-wai

Lai Man-wai (1893-1953) had been a film pioneer in Hong Kong and a leading reformist for Chinese cinema. The Diary of Lai Man-wai not only chronicles the life of Lai and his family, it is also an invaluable record of Chinese history and film history, spanning from the early 20th century to the 1950s. Part of this diary was first published in the book Lai Man-wai: The Man, The Time, Cinema, now revised and expanded by Lai Shek. Explanatory notes have been added by the collator and editors to delve deeper into the personal life of this legendary figure. Contains 64 pages, published in 2003, priced at HK$28. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Currently out of stock. (Collated by Lai Shek)

ISBN 962-8050-24-9

Exhibition Brochure on The Psychic Labyrinth of F.W. Murnau

The Psychic Labyrinth of F.W. Murnau

Accompanying the complete retrospective on German expressionist film master F.W. Murnau, a brochure carrying the same title has been published. Besides details of the screenings and highlights of the exhibition, a number of newly compiled thematic essays are included which make this 64-page brochure a fairly comprehensive record on Murnau. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 2003. Priced at HK$40. (Edited by Winnie Fu)

ISBN 962-8050-23-0

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The Shaw Screen: A Preliminary Study

邵氏電影初探

The Shaw Screen: A Preliminary Study

Shaw films are known for their rich doses of fantasy and strong flavour of Chinese culture. The paradoxes and imagination evident in their films were shared by a modern Hong Kong society taking shape throughout the decades. But there's one motif threading their productions–‘entertainment first'. The book explores the working of film genres, the studio and star systems inside the Shaw film empire and offers a window to re-examining the interaction between films and the time. In separate Chinese and English editions. Published in 2003. Priced at HK$130 each. Chinese edition currently out of stock. (Edited by Wong Ain-ling)

Chinese edition: ISBN 962-8050-20-6
English edition: ISBN 962-8050-21-4

Further information

'Shaws Galaxy of Stars' Exhibition Brochure

'Shaws Galaxy of Stars' Exhibition Catalogue

Shaw Brothers' film productions spread over a few decades and are rich in all namable genres. One of Shaws' greatest contributions is its efforts in grooming a whole lot of filmic talents, which will be the focus of the exhibition. The accompanying exhibition catalogue provides a brief introduction to Shaws' talent training schemes, followed by a fine selection of photos covering over 70 stars, including our evergreen beauty Li Lihua, the charming Linda Lin Dai, classical beauty Betty Loh Ti, women killer Yan Jun, Chao Lei, Peter Chen Ho and romantic hero Jimmy Wang Yu, just to name a few. Besides, there are a full-colour graphic compilation of the galaxy of stars printed in panoramic scale plus a special section on the 'Top Star of Shaws, Cantonese Unit' Patrick Lam Fung. Contains 52 pages, published in 2003, priced at HK$35. Currently out of stock. (Co-edited by Law Kar and Stephanie Ng)

ISBN 962-8050-22-2

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The Cathay Story

The Cathay Story

The productions of Cathay / MP & GI have themselves become a myth of Hong Kong cinema. What accounts for its radiance and elegance? And why was the audience broken-hearted to see its decline? The Cathay Story may offer a little clue.... 400 page thick with 16 colour pages. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 2002, priced at HK$130. Currently out of stock. A Revised Edition newly released in March 2009. (Edited by Wong Ain-ling)

ISBN 962-8050-16-8

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The Swordsman and His Jiang Hu: Tsui Hark and Hong Kong Film

The Swordsman and His Jiang Hu: Tsui Hark and Hong Kong Film

The book explores the intricate relationships between the legendary Tsui Hark and Hong Kong cinema, through accounts by filmmakers and Tsui's own memoirs. 293 page thick with 20 colour pages. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 2002, priced at HK$100. Currently out of stock.
(Co-edited by Sam Ho and Ho Wai-leng)

ISBN 962-8050-15-X

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i-GENERATIONs: Independent, Experimental and Alternative Creations from the 60s to Now

i-GENERATIONs: Independent, Experimental and Alternative Creations from the 60s to Now

Compiling articles, including Roger Garcia (S N Ko)'s essay originally published in Cinemaya - The Asian Film Quarterly in 1995, by insiders to review the development of independent shorts in Hong Kong. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 2001, priced at HK$25. (Edited by May Fung)

ISBN 962-8050-13-3

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A Century of Chinese Cinema: Look Back in Glory

A Century of Chinese Cinema:
Look Back in Glory


Analytical essays on 25 classic Chinese films from the last century, written by notable film critics. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 2001, priced at HK$45. (Edited by Hong Kong Film Critics Society)

ISBN 962-8050-11-7

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Hong Kong Cinema - From Handicraft to High Tech

Hong Kong Cinema -
From Handicraft to High Tech


The development of the arts and technical aspects of the Hong Kong cinema, from the earliest handicraft to the present computer generated effects. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 2001, priced at HK$23. (Co-edited by Law Kar & Winnie Fu)

ISBN 962-8050-12-5

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Living in Hong Kong - the 50s and 60s

Living in Hong Kong - the 50s and 60s
(in Chinese)

A brief introduction of life in Hong Kong in the 50s and 60s. Published in 2001, priced at HK$25. (Co-edited by Law Kar & Stephanie Ng)

ISBN 962-8050-10-9

Hong Kong on the Silver Screen (Catalogue and VCD)

Hong Kong on the Silver Screen
(Catalogue & VCD)


A chronicle of Hong Kong's history through the images on film. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 2001, priced at HK$30. Currently out of stock. (Co-edited by Jacob Wong & Ho Wai-leng)

ISBN 962-8050-09-5

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The Making of Martial Arts Films - As Told by Filmmakers and Stars

The Making of Martial Arts Films - As Told by Filmmakers and Stars

A journey through the history of Hong Kong martial arts films based on our Oral History recordings. Filmmakers recollecting their past include prominent directors, stars and action choreographers. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 1999, priced at HK$60. Currently out of stock. (Edited by Winnie Fu)

ISBN 962-8050-06-0

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Hong Kong Film Archive Treasures: An Exhibition

Hong Kong Film Archive Treasures: An Exhibition

A 100-page catalogue with over a hundred colour pictures and detailed descriptions featuring the 1998 Archive exhibition. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 1998, priced at HK$60. Currently out of stock. (Edited by Winnie Fu)

ISBN 962-8050-04-4

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50 Years of the Hong Kong Film Production and Distribution Industries: An Exhibition (1947-1997)

50 Years of the Hong Kong Film Production and Distribution Industries: An Exhibition (1947-97)

The catalogue focuses on Hong Kong film production and distribution over fifty years. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 1997, priced at HK$53. Currently out of stock. (Edited by Mary Wong)

ISBN 962-8050-02-8

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Superstars of Cantonese Movies of the Sixties Exhibition

Superstars of Cantonese Movies of the Sixties Exhibition Catalogue

The catalogue covers 27 actors and actresses of the 1960s, including Patrick Tse Yin, Connie Chan Po-chu, Josephine Siao and Lui Kay, etc. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 1996. Currently out of stock.

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The Early Days of Hong Kong Cinema: An Exhibition (1896-1950)

The Early Days of Hong Kong Cinema: An Exhibition (1896-1950)

The catalogue briefly introduces the development of the Hong Kong cinema from 1896 to 1950. Bilingual in Chinese and English. Published in 1995. Currently out of stock.

Further information

 
 

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